Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/274413
Title:
Foucault, Levinas and the Ethical Embodied Subject
Authors:
Lok, Wing-Kai
Abstract:
This dissertation attempts to interrogate whether the postmodern anti-essentialist approach to the body can truly recognize the ethical value of the body. For the postmodernists, the value of the human body has long been repressed by Cartesian rationalism and dualism that privileges the mind over the body. Dualism is a form of reductionism that reduces either the mind to the body or the body to the mind. It not only fails to recognize an interaction between mind and body, but also privileges one side at the expense of the other. For instance, rationalism is a dualist reductionism since it always explains the body and matter in terms of mind or reason. Thus, dualism not only refers to a split or separation between mind and body, but also refers to a reductive relation between mind and body.
Advisors:
Zuidervaart, Lambert
Other Contributors:
Goris, W.
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Publisher:
Institute for Christian Studies
Issue Date:
5-Jul-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/274413
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Foucault, Michel, 1926-1984; Levinas, Emmanuel; Ethics; Other (Philosophy); Subject (Philosophy); Mind and body
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
Rights holder:
This Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.
Degree Title:
Conjoint Ph.D. by the Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto and the VU University Amsterdam
Appears in Collections:
Doctoral Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorZuidervaart, Lamberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorLok, Wing-Kaien_GB
dc.contributor.otherGoris, W.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-20T18:05:59Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-20T18:05:59Z-
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen
dc.date.issued2011-07-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/274413-
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation attempts to interrogate whether the postmodern anti-essentialist approach to the body can truly recognize the ethical value of the body. For the postmodernists, the value of the human body has long been repressed by Cartesian rationalism and dualism that privileges the mind over the body. Dualism is a form of reductionism that reduces either the mind to the body or the body to the mind. It not only fails to recognize an interaction between mind and body, but also privileges one side at the expense of the other. For instance, rationalism is a dualist reductionism since it always explains the body and matter in terms of mind or reason. Thus, dualism not only refers to a split or separation between mind and body, but also refers to a reductive relation between mind and body.en_GB
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/-
dc.subjectFoucault, Michel, 1926-1984en_GB
dc.subjectLevinas, Emmanuelen_GB
dc.subjectEthicsen_GB
dc.subjectOther (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.subjectSubject (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.subjectMind and bodyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshFoucault, Michel, 1926-1984--Ethicsen_GB
dc.subject.lcshLevinas, Emmanuel--Ethicsen_GB
dc.subject.lcshOther (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.subject.lcshSubject (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.subject.lcshMind and bodyen_GB
dc.titleFoucault, Levinas and the Ethical Embodied Subjecten
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleConjoint Ph.D. by the Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto and the VU University Amsterdamen
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
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