Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/285097
Title:
Reading The Brothers Karamazov in Burundi
Authors:
Atfield, Tom
Abstract:
In 1999, aged eighteen, I read 'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoevsky. I read this novel in Burundi, where I witnessed the suffering of others. The country's basic problem was civil war, which is best described in this terse note: "Rwanda, the sequel. Same story, different location. Nobody cares." The well-publicised problems in Rwanda in 1994 didn't end, they went next-door. The only thing separating the problems of those two countries was the most heavily landmined stretch of road on the planet. It was on this road, which was littered with the remains of vehicles and people, that I experienced the immediacy of 'the problem of evil'.I had hoped that the book I held in my hands on those lifetime-long hours on the road would resonate with my experience. Ivan Karamazov's accusation of the God who creates a world of atrocities seemed fuelled by an unflinching look at senseless, disteleological suffering. I had hoped that Ivan, with his face turned against God, could countenance the horror I saw. Karamazov's stance has been seen as the antithesis of theodicy, which is the attempt to reconcile faith in God with the existence of evil. This antithesis seems to overcome the distance between the experience of real suffering and the account of that suffering given by academic theodicy. Ultimately, however, that distance remains. Dostoevsky's protagonist in his railing against God connects no more with the victims in this world than a writer of theodicy does with her defence of God.
Advisors:
Ansell, Nicholas John
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Publisher:
Institute for Christian Studies
Issue Date:
Oct-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/285097
Additional Links:
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR17787.PDF
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881; Suffering; Theodicy; Genocide
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
Rights holder:
This Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.
Degree Title:
Master of Philosophical Foundations
Appears in Collections:
Older Masters Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorAnsell, Nicholas Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAtfield, Tomen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-25T19:56:48Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-25T19:56:48Z-
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_GB
dc.date.issued2005-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/285097-
dc.description.abstractIn 1999, aged eighteen, I read 'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoevsky. I read this novel in Burundi, where I witnessed the suffering of others. The country's basic problem was civil war, which is best described in this terse note: "Rwanda, the sequel. Same story, different location. Nobody cares." The well-publicised problems in Rwanda in 1994 didn't end, they went next-door. The only thing separating the problems of those two countries was the most heavily landmined stretch of road on the planet. It was on this road, which was littered with the remains of vehicles and people, that I experienced the immediacy of 'the problem of evil'.I had hoped that the book I held in my hands on those lifetime-long hours on the road would resonate with my experience. Ivan Karamazov's accusation of the God who creates a world of atrocities seemed fuelled by an unflinching look at senseless, disteleological suffering. I had hoped that Ivan, with his face turned against God, could countenance the horror I saw. Karamazov's stance has been seen as the antithesis of theodicy, which is the attempt to reconcile faith in God with the existence of evil. This antithesis seems to overcome the distance between the experience of real suffering and the account of that suffering given by academic theodicy. Ultimately, however, that distance remains. Dostoevsky's protagonist in his railing against God connects no more with the victims in this world than a writer of theodicy does with her defence of God.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR17787.PDFen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/-
dc.subjectDostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881en_GB
dc.subjectSufferingen_GB
dc.subjectTheodicyen_GB
dc.subjectGenocideen_GB
dc.subject.lcshSuffering--Religious aspectsen_GB
dc.subject.lcshTheodicyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshGenocide--Burundien_GB
dc.subject.lcshGenocide--Rwandaen_GB
dc.subject.lcshDostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881. The Brothers Karamazoven_GB
dc.titleReading The Brothers Karamazov in Burundien
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleMaster of Philosophical Foundationsen_GB
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
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