Written Into the Land: Use, Identity and the Human Awakening to an Eloquent Creation

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/285315
Title:
Written Into the Land: Use, Identity and the Human Awakening to an Eloquent Creation
Authors:
D'Angelo, Christopher J. M.
Abstract:
This thesis argues that human land use is a decisive yet commonly overlooked indication of the sort of people we are. As such, to grasp that we live in a world in 'ecological crisis' requires grappling with the moral, spiritual and narrative underpinnings and effects of those twentieth century shifts in urban/suburban development and farming practices that have so dramatically altered the North American cultural and geographical landscape. In particular, this dilemma is approached from a biblically informed Christian perspective. Chapter 1 proposes that understanding and experiencing the world as Creation requires accounting for the embodied and wondrous character of existence. Chapter 2 examines aspects of the biblical narrative that provide resources for rethinking destructive land use patterns. In conversation with agrarians and new urbanists, Chapter 3 provides an agrarian ethic for urbanites; a vision rooted in agrarianism that acknowledges how deeply the fate and health of cities and farms are intertwined.
Advisors:
Kuipers, Ronald A.
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Publisher:
Institute for Christian Studies
Issue Date:
Feb-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/285315
Additional Links:
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR58274.PDF
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Land use; Agriculture; Ecology
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0
Rights holder:
This Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.
Degree Title:
Master of Arts (Philosophy)
Appears in Collections:
Older Masters Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorKuipers, Ronald A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorD'Angelo, Christopher J. M.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-26T17:43:49Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-26T17:43:49Z-
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_GB
dc.date.issued2009-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/285315-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues that human land use is a decisive yet commonly overlooked indication of the sort of people we are. As such, to grasp that we live in a world in 'ecological crisis' requires grappling with the moral, spiritual and narrative underpinnings and effects of those twentieth century shifts in urban/suburban development and farming practices that have so dramatically altered the North American cultural and geographical landscape. In particular, this dilemma is approached from a biblically informed Christian perspective. Chapter 1 proposes that understanding and experiencing the world as Creation requires accounting for the embodied and wondrous character of existence. Chapter 2 examines aspects of the biblical narrative that provide resources for rethinking destructive land use patterns. In conversation with agrarians and new urbanists, Chapter 3 provides an agrarian ethic for urbanites; a vision rooted in agrarianism that acknowledges how deeply the fate and health of cities and farms are intertwined.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR58274.PDFen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0-
dc.subjectLand useen_GB
dc.subjectAgricultureen_GB
dc.subjectEcologyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshLand use--Biblical teachingen_GB
dc.subject.lcshAgriculture--Religious aspects--Christianityen_GB
dc.subject.lcshEcology--Religious aspects--Christianityen_GB
dc.titleWritten Into the Land: Use, Identity and the Human Awakening to an Eloquent Creationen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleMaster of Arts (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
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