Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/288532
Title:
Teleology in the Thought of William of Ockham
Authors:
Zylstra, Stephen John
Abstract:
This thesis offers an account of William of Ockham's understanding of teleology in order to question the standard modernist history of the concept. Ockham does not rely on the Aristotelian analogy between art and nature to establish that all natural things seek an end. Nor does he simply relativize the analogy by considering all creatures as having their ends fixed by God. Instead, Ockham draws a sharp distinction between voluntary and natural agency, which results in two very different uses of final causality. On the one hand, the way in which final causes operate in voluntary agents cannot compromise their freedom. On the other hand, the way they operate in natural agents cannot explain their necessity. Ockham negotiates the radical difference between the causality of voluntary and natural agents by positing a new analogy altogether, comparing it to the difference between will and intellect.
Advisors:
Sweetman, Robert
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Publisher:
Institute for Christian Studies
Issue Date:
Jul-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/288532
Additional Links:
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR30197.PDF
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Teleology; William, of Ockham, ca. 1285-ca. 1349
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
Rights holder:
This Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.
Degree Title:
Master of Arts (Philosophy)
Appears in Collections:
Older Masters Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSweetman, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorZylstra, Stephen Johnen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-06T15:57:21Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-06T15:57:21Z-
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_GB
dc.date.issued2007-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/288532-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis offers an account of William of Ockham's understanding of teleology in order to question the standard modernist history of the concept. Ockham does not rely on the Aristotelian analogy between art and nature to establish that all natural things seek an end. Nor does he simply relativize the analogy by considering all creatures as having their ends fixed by God. Instead, Ockham draws a sharp distinction between voluntary and natural agency, which results in two very different uses of final causality. On the one hand, the way in which final causes operate in voluntary agents cannot compromise their freedom. On the other hand, the way they operate in natural agents cannot explain their necessity. Ockham negotiates the radical difference between the causality of voluntary and natural agents by positing a new analogy altogether, comparing it to the difference between will and intellect.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR30197.PDFen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/-
dc.subjectTeleologyen_GB
dc.subjectWilliam, of Ockham, ca. 1285-ca. 1349en_GB
dc.titleTeleology in the Thought of William of Ockhamen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleMaster of Arts (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
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