Discovering Connection: The Dynamic Tension and a 'More-Than' in an Eckhartian Conception of Soul

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/288660
Title:
Discovering Connection: The Dynamic Tension and a 'More-Than' in an Eckhartian Conception of Soul
Authors:
Schulz-Wackerbarth, Yorick Immanuel
Abstract:
This thesis is first and foremost the result of my grappling with the works of Meister Eckhart. Accordingly, I intend to present here my reading of Eckhart's thought. This reading, my struggle to interpret the Meister, was, from the beginning, however, motivated by the aim to join a certain conversation. This conversation is what I have come to know as 'Christian philosophy'. I am new to the circles of those who admit to be participating in this scandalous project, yet already I have become quite aware of the controversy pervading this notion. It comes to the fore not only in the critical voices from the 'outside', questioning its meaning, relevance and legitimacy, but also in a lack of 'internal' consensus concerning its entailments. This is not necessarily a point of criticism on my part. In fact, I am much a proponent of conversations or projects that have an openness to them and lack clear cut deliminations. It does, however, make a brief apologia in preparation to this thesis necessary. I have no ambition whatsoever to state here what Christian philosophy is or should be. God forbid! I merely deem it important to place my project in context, and for that purpose I intend here to point out to the reader the direction I am facing. Thus, what needs to be clarified at the outset of my argument is that particular understanding of Christian philosophy this thesis intends to engage. The question here is, where and how to locate the conversation this thesis hopes to join. [from Prologue, p. 3]
Advisors:
Sweetman, Robert
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Publisher:
Institute for Christian Studies
Issue Date:
Feb-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/288660
Additional Links:
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR18020.PDF
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Eckhart, Meister, d. 1327; Soul; Philosophy and religion; Philosophical anthropology
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
Rights holder:
This Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.
Degree Title:
Master of Philosophical Foundations
Appears in Collections:
Older Masters Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSweetman, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchulz-Wackerbarth, Yorick Immanuelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-08T19:34:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-08T19:34:30Z-
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_GB
dc.date.issued2004-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/288660-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is first and foremost the result of my grappling with the works of Meister Eckhart. Accordingly, I intend to present here my reading of Eckhart's thought. This reading, my struggle to interpret the Meister, was, from the beginning, however, motivated by the aim to join a certain conversation. This conversation is what I have come to know as 'Christian philosophy'. I am new to the circles of those who admit to be participating in this scandalous project, yet already I have become quite aware of the controversy pervading this notion. It comes to the fore not only in the critical voices from the 'outside', questioning its meaning, relevance and legitimacy, but also in a lack of 'internal' consensus concerning its entailments. This is not necessarily a point of criticism on my part. In fact, I am much a proponent of conversations or projects that have an openness to them and lack clear cut deliminations. It does, however, make a brief apologia in preparation to this thesis necessary. I have no ambition whatsoever to state here what Christian philosophy is or should be. God forbid! I merely deem it important to place my project in context, and for that purpose I intend here to point out to the reader the direction I am facing. Thus, what needs to be clarified at the outset of my argument is that particular understanding of Christian philosophy this thesis intends to engage. The question here is, where and how to locate the conversation this thesis hopes to join. [from Prologue, p. 3]en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR18020.PDFen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/-
dc.subjectEckhart, Meister, d. 1327en_GB
dc.subjectSoulen_GB
dc.subjectPhilosophy and religionen_GB
dc.subjectPhilosophical anthropologyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshSoulen_GB
dc.subject.lcshPhilosophy and religionen_GB
dc.subject.lcshPhilosophical anthropologyen_GB
dc.titleDiscovering Connection: The Dynamic Tension and a 'More-Than' in an Eckhartian Conception of Soulen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleMaster of Philosophical Foundationsen_GB
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
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