Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/303642
Title:
The Quest for Pleasure and the Death of Life
Authors:
Kirby, Joseph Morrill
Abstract:
In this paper, I present a parallel between Schopenhauer, who argues that a purely rational being would see life as meaningless suffering and therefore refuse to inflict existence on a new generation of humans, and economist Lester Thurow, who argues that it is irrational to care about what happens to the world after one's own death, even if this means the extinction of the human species. I show first how these attitudes stem from an orientation that judges life in terms of pleasure and pain. Then, with reference to an article by Amien Kacou, I seek to refute this orientation, showing how a conscious being that actually saw pleasure as its highest good would likely become miserable - or, conversely, that the only way for such a being to actually experience pleasure would be for it to see justice as more important than its own individual satisfaction. I conclude with some reflections on what this means in terms of Nietzsche's statement "God is dead," and what ramifications it has on the current ecological crisis.
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Citation:
Kirby, Joseph Morrill. "The Quest for Pleasure and the Death of Life," Cosmos and History: the Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 7 (2011): 94-113, accessed October 18, 2013, http://cosmosandhistory.org/index.php/journal/article/viewFile/250/387
Publisher:
Cosmos Publishing Cooperative
Journal:
Cosmos and History: the Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/303642
Additional Links:
http://www.academia.edu/2379444/The_Quest_for_Pleasure_and_the_Death_of_Life; http://cosmosandhistory.org/index.php/journal/article/viewFile/250/387
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Schopenhauer, Arthur, 1788-1860; Philosophy, German; Life; Human beings; Ecological crisis; Justice (Philosophy); Pleasure; Existence; Thurow, Lester C.; Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1844-1900; Suffering
ISSN:
1832-9101
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
Rights holder:
In short, copyright for articles published in this journal is retained by the authors, with first publication rights granted to the journal. By virtue of their appearance in this open access journal, articles are free to use, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. [http://cosmosandhistory.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions#copyrightNotice]
Appears in Collections:
Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKirby, Joseph Morrillen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-18T19:11:12Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-18T19:11:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationKirby, Joseph Morrill. "The Quest for Pleasure and the Death of Life," Cosmos and History: the Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 7 (2011): 94-113, accessed October 18, 2013, http://cosmosandhistory.org/index.php/journal/article/viewFile/250/387en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1832-9101-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/303642-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I present a parallel between Schopenhauer, who argues that a purely rational being would see life as meaningless suffering and therefore refuse to inflict existence on a new generation of humans, and economist Lester Thurow, who argues that it is irrational to care about what happens to the world after one's own death, even if this means the extinction of the human species. I show first how these attitudes stem from an orientation that judges life in terms of pleasure and pain. Then, with reference to an article by Amien Kacou, I seek to refute this orientation, showing how a conscious being that actually saw pleasure as its highest good would likely become miserable - or, conversely, that the only way for such a being to actually experience pleasure would be for it to see justice as more important than its own individual satisfaction. I conclude with some reflections on what this means in terms of Nietzsche's statement "God is dead," and what ramifications it has on the current ecological crisis.en_GB
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCosmos Publishing Cooperativeen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.academia.edu/2379444/The_Quest_for_Pleasure_and_the_Death_of_Lifeen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://cosmosandhistory.org/index.php/journal/article/viewFile/250/387en_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/-
dc.subjectSchopenhauer, Arthur, 1788-1860en_GB
dc.subjectPhilosophy, Germanen_GB
dc.subjectLifeen_GB
dc.subjectHuman beingsen_GB
dc.subjectEcological crisisen_GB
dc.subjectJustice (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.subjectPleasureen_GB
dc.subjectExistenceen_GB
dc.subjectThurow, Lester C.en_GB
dc.subjectNietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1844-1900en_GB
dc.subjectSufferingen_GB
dc.subject.lcshSufferingen_GB
dc.subject.lcshPleasureen_GB
dc.subject.lcshHuman beingsen_GB
dc.subject.lcshHuman ecologyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshJustice (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.titleThe Quest for Pleasure and the Death of Lifeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.journalCosmos and History: the Journal of Natural and Social Philosophyen_GB
dc.rights.holderIn short, copyright for articles published in this journal is retained by the authors, with first publication rights granted to the journal. By virtue of their appearance in this open access journal, articles are free to use, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. [http://cosmosandhistory.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions#copyrightNotice]en_GB
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