Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/305702
Title:
Critical Transformations: Macrostructures, Religion, and Critique
Authors:
Zuidervaart, Lambert
Abstract:
Can critical research on religion offer both an ideology critique and a critical retrieval of religious import? This essay suggests that it can, offering a programmatic sketch for a full-fledged critique of religion—a critique both aimed at religion and inspired by religion in a self-critical fashion. The sketch weds elements of a robustly normative critique of Western society with insights derived from the Frankfurt School. First the essay maps three societal macrostructures that organize much of contemporary social life—civil society, proprietary economy, and administrative state. Then it discusses solidarity, resourcefulness, and justice as societal principles that can sustain a critique of societal macrostructures. Next it identifies normative deficiencies within and between these macrostructures. On the basis of this architectonic critique, the essay then provides an account of religion in its critical and utopian roles. It concludes by envisioning a normative and emancipatory transformation of society as a whole.
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies and University of Toronto, Canada
Citation:
Zuidervaart, Lambert. "Critical Transformations: Macrostructures, Religion, and Critique." Critical Research on Religion 1.3 (2013): 243-269
Publisher:
SAGE Publications Ltd.
Journal:
Critical Research on Religion
Issue Date:
Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/305702
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The version of this essay in ICS’s Institutional Repository is the one accepted for publication. The final definitive version, which includes an abstract and keywords as well as a diagram of societal macrostructures, has been published in the journal Critical Research on Religion 1.3 (2013): 243-269 by SAGE Publications Ltd., All rights reserved. © Lambert Zuidervaart. The published version has the DOI 10.1177/2050303213506475 and can be found at the SAGE Journals Online site: http://online.sagepub.com
Keywords:
Administrative state; Capitalism; Civil society; Critical theory; Religion; Social transformation
ISSN:
2050-3032
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
Rights holder:
Published by: Sage Publications Ltd. Available online to libraries and individuals through SAGE Premier 2013. DOI 10.1177/2050303213506475
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZuidervaart, Lamberten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-22T15:03:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-22T15:03:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-
dc.identifier.citationZuidervaart, Lambert. "Critical Transformations: Macrostructures, Religion, and Critique." Critical Research on Religion 1.3 (2013): 243-269en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2050-3032-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/305702-
dc.descriptionThe version of this essay in ICS’s Institutional Repository is the one accepted for publication. The final definitive version, which includes an abstract and keywords as well as a diagram of societal macrostructures, has been published in the journal Critical Research on Religion 1.3 (2013): 243-269 by SAGE Publications Ltd., All rights reserved. © Lambert Zuidervaart. The published version has the DOI 10.1177/2050303213506475 and can be found at the SAGE Journals Online site: http://online.sagepub.comen_GB
dc.description.abstractCan critical research on religion offer both an ideology critique and a critical retrieval of religious import? This essay suggests that it can, offering a programmatic sketch for a full-fledged critique of religion—a critique both aimed at religion and inspired by religion in a self-critical fashion. The sketch weds elements of a robustly normative critique of Western society with insights derived from the Frankfurt School. First the essay maps three societal macrostructures that organize much of contemporary social life—civil society, proprietary economy, and administrative state. Then it discusses solidarity, resourcefulness, and justice as societal principles that can sustain a critique of societal macrostructures. Next it identifies normative deficiencies within and between these macrostructures. On the basis of this architectonic critique, the essay then provides an account of religion in its critical and utopian roles. It concludes by envisioning a normative and emancipatory transformation of society as a whole.en_GB
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Ltd.en_GB
dc.relation.uriDOI 10.1177/2050303213506475-
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/-
dc.subjectAdministrative stateen_GB
dc.subjectCapitalismen_GB
dc.subjectCivil societyen_GB
dc.subjectCritical theoryen_GB
dc.subjectReligionen_GB
dc.subjectSocial transformationen_GB
dc.subject.lcshState, Theen_GB
dc.subject.lcshCapitalismen_GB
dc.subject.lcshCivil societyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshReligionen_GB
dc.titleCritical Transformations: Macrostructures, Religion, and Critiqueen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studies and University of Toronto, Canadaen_GB
dc.identifier.journalCritical Research on Religionen_GB
dc.rights.holderPublished by: Sage Publications Ltd. Available online to libraries and individuals through SAGE Premier 2013. DOI 10.1177/2050303213506475en_GB
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