Action, Love, and the World: An Inquiry Into the Political Relevance of Christian Charity (With Constant Reference to Hannah Arendt)

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/313380
Title:
Action, Love, and the World: An Inquiry Into the Political Relevance of Christian Charity (With Constant Reference to Hannah Arendt)
Authors:
Tebbutt, Andrew
Abstract:
In The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt identifies the central principle that has defined Christian communities since their earliest appearance as “worldlessness.” On Arendt’s analysis, Christianity has always tended to found relations between people on charity, a virtue that, due to its affiliation with the anti-political experience of passionate love, is incapable of serving as the basis of any public realm or common political world. This thesis aims to reconcile the virtue of charity to Arendt’s political vision on the basis of a reconsideration of love’s “worldlessness.” In the first two chapters, I characterize Arendt as a political thinker and provide an account of her ideas of political action and the common world. In the third chapter, I place Arendt’s understanding of the world in dialogue with Jean-Luc Marion’s phenomenological account of charity, which dissociates charity from the idea of passion and presents it as an act of will through which one resolves to see past the simple objectivity of the world and to perceive the invisible “flesh” or personhood of others. Charity is “worldless”—and thus crucial to an Arendtian understanding of politics—in the sense that it looks beyond what the world automatically makes present in order to “see” the other person and to invite her voice into the common world of speech and action.
Advisors:
Kuipers, Ronald A.
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Publisher:
Institute for Christian Studies
Issue Date:
21-Mar-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/313380
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Keywords:
Arendt, Hannah, 1906-1975; Arendt, Hannah, 1906-1975. Human condition; Sociology; Charity; Marion, Jean-Luc, 1946-; Phenomenology; Christian sociology; Christianity and politics; Philosophy and religion; Love
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Rights holder:
This Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.
Degree Title:
Master of Arts (Philosophy)
Appears in Collections:
Masters Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorKuipers, Ronald A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTebbutt, Andrewen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-26T14:40:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-26T14:40:19Z-
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_GB
dc.date.issued2013-03-21-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/313380-
dc.description.abstractIn The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt identifies the central principle that has defined Christian communities since their earliest appearance as “worldlessness.” On Arendt’s analysis, Christianity has always tended to found relations between people on charity, a virtue that, due to its affiliation with the anti-political experience of passionate love, is incapable of serving as the basis of any public realm or common political world. This thesis aims to reconcile the virtue of charity to Arendt’s political vision on the basis of a reconsideration of love’s “worldlessness.” In the first two chapters, I characterize Arendt as a political thinker and provide an account of her ideas of political action and the common world. In the third chapter, I place Arendt’s understanding of the world in dialogue with Jean-Luc Marion’s phenomenological account of charity, which dissociates charity from the idea of passion and presents it as an act of will through which one resolves to see past the simple objectivity of the world and to perceive the invisible “flesh” or personhood of others. Charity is “worldless”—and thus crucial to an Arendtian understanding of politics—in the sense that it looks beyond what the world automatically makes present in order to “see” the other person and to invite her voice into the common world of speech and action.en_GB
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- The human condition and its political importance -- Action and the world -- The political worldlessness of charity -- Conclusionen_GB
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licenseen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_GB
dc.subjectArendt, Hannah, 1906-1975en_GB
dc.subjectArendt, Hannah, 1906-1975. Human conditionen_GB
dc.subjectSociologyen_GB
dc.subjectCharityen_GB
dc.subjectMarion, Jean-Luc, 1946-en_GB
dc.subjectPhenomenologyen_GB
dc.subjectChristian sociologyen_GB
dc.subjectChristianity and politicsen_GB
dc.subjectPhilosophy and religionen_GB
dc.subjectLoveen_GB
dc.subject.lcshArendt, Hannah, 1906-1975en_GB
dc.subject.lcshArendt, Hannah, 1906-1975--Philosophyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshMarion, Jean-Luc, 1946-en_GB
dc.subject.lcshMarion, Jean-Luc, 1946- --Philosophyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshChristianity and politicsen_GB
dc.subject.lcshCharityen_GB
dc.subject.lcshChristian sociologyen_GB
dc.subject.lcshLoveen_GB
dc.titleAction, Love, and the World: An Inquiry Into the Political Relevance of Christian Charity (With Constant Reference to Hannah Arendt)en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleMaster of Arts (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
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