Songs of Solidarity: A New Approach to Liturgical Music and Community Cohesion

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/315289
Title:
Songs of Solidarity: A New Approach to Liturgical Music and Community Cohesion
Authors:
Johnson, Matthew E.
Abstract:
In this paper, I will focus on a single type of music used in a religious setting, namely congregational song, which I will broadly refer to as “liturgical music.” Though liturgical music in the context of Christian community serves a variety of functions for community participants, this paper will focus on two major functions liturgical music plays in the way it facilitates community coherence: (1) it connects participants via embodied empathetic imagination to a particular defining narrative or mythology, and (2) it connects participants via co-performance directly to one another. I will suggest that liturgical art in religious community is actually a constitutive force in that community, having the capability of illuminating and affirming the communal identity shared by the participants. Participation in liturgical music is a way of actively shaping the community as a community, re-telling together a deeply held defining mythology in the context of the present world and creating a shared moment of co-performance in which participants enter into true face-to-face relationships with one another. Finally, I will illustrate how these functions may play out in a religious community through an analysis of Psalm 136’s content and use in ancient Israelite liturgy.
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Citation:
Johnson, Matthew E. "Songs of Solidarity: A New Approach to Liturgical Music and Community Cohesion" (paper presented at the 20th Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference (AGIC), Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, March 6, 2014).
Issue Date:
6-Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/315289
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Description:
This paper won 2nd place in the Concordia University Religion Department's Annual Graduate Conference, In/Tangibility: The Mystical, The Material and the Messy In-Between.
Keywords:
Liturgical music; Church music; Music and philosophy; Community; Mythology; Durkheim, Émile; Imagination; Empathy; Smith, James K. A.; Schütz, Alfred; Musical performance; Co-performance; Bible. Psalm 136; Psalmody; Brueggemann, Walter
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Rights holder:
This Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:
Conference Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Matthew E.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-03T18:37:07Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-03T18:37:07Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-06-
dc.identifier.citationJohnson, Matthew E. "Songs of Solidarity: A New Approach to Liturgical Music and Community Cohesion" (paper presented at the 20th Annual Graduate Interdisciplinary Conference (AGIC), Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, March 6, 2014).en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/315289-
dc.descriptionThis paper won 2nd place in the Concordia University Religion Department's Annual Graduate Conference, In/Tangibility: The Mystical, The Material and the Messy In-Between.en_GB
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I will focus on a single type of music used in a religious setting, namely congregational song, which I will broadly refer to as “liturgical music.” Though liturgical music in the context of Christian community serves a variety of functions for community participants, this paper will focus on two major functions liturgical music plays in the way it facilitates community coherence: (1) it connects participants via embodied empathetic imagination to a particular defining narrative or mythology, and (2) it connects participants via co-performance directly to one another. I will suggest that liturgical art in religious community is actually a constitutive force in that community, having the capability of illuminating and affirming the communal identity shared by the participants. Participation in liturgical music is a way of actively shaping the community as a community, re-telling together a deeply held defining mythology in the context of the present world and creating a shared moment of co-performance in which participants enter into true face-to-face relationships with one another. Finally, I will illustrate how these functions may play out in a religious community through an analysis of Psalm 136’s content and use in ancient Israelite liturgy.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licenseen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_GB
dc.subjectLiturgical musicen_GB
dc.subjectChurch musicen_GB
dc.subjectMusic and philosophyen_GB
dc.subjectCommunityen_GB
dc.subjectMythologyen_GB
dc.subjectDurkheim, Émileen_GB
dc.subjectImaginationen_GB
dc.subjectEmpathyen_GB
dc.subjectSmith, James K. A.en_GB
dc.subjectSchütz, Alfreden_GB
dc.subjectMusical performanceen_GB
dc.subjectCo-performanceen_GB
dc.subjectBible. Psalm 136en_GB
dc.subjectPsalmodyen_GB
dc.subjectBrueggemann, Walteren_GB
dc.titleSongs of Solidarity: A New Approach to Liturgical Music and Community Cohesionen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
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