Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/344215
Title:
Short Circuits and Market Failure: Theories of the Civic Sector
Authors:
Zuidervaart, Lambert
Abstract:
This paper reviews three social scientific accounts of the civic sector's role in society: the government failure, contract failure, and voluntary failure theories. All three explain the role of nonprofit organizations as compensating for the market's failure to provide certain collective goods. This approach involves a radical misinterpretation of the underlying principles of civic sector organizations. An account is needed that explains their economy in terms of their normative concerns, rather than explaining normative concerns in terms of their economy. I lay a foundation for such an account by examining (1) the self-understanding among civic sector organizations that they should be "mission-driven," and (2) the implications of this self-understanding for the sector as a "social economy." Whereas "mission-drivenness" calls attention to service-provision, resource-sharing, and open communication as the normative core of civic sector organizations, the notion of a "social economy" suggests a recirculation of money into channels where standard economic logic no longer holds. The key to the civic sector's role lies not in responses to market failure, but in the short-circuiting of a money-driven capitalist economy.
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Citation:
Zuidervaart, Lambert. "Short Circuits and Market Failure: Theories of the Civic Sector." Phaidea Project Online: Papers Presented at the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Boston, Massachusetts, August 10-15, 1998. <http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Soci/SociZuid.htm>
Publisher:
Phaidea Project Online
Issue Date:
Aug-1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/344215
Additional Links:
http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Soci/SociZuid.htm
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Keywords:
Civic sector; Social economy; Nonprofit organizations; Market failure; Mission-driven
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections:
Conference Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZuidervaart, Lamberten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-05T17:12:26Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-05T17:12:26Z-
dc.date.issued1998-08-
dc.identifier.citationZuidervaart, Lambert. "Short Circuits and Market Failure: Theories of the Civic Sector." Phaidea Project Online: Papers Presented at the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Boston, Massachusetts, August 10-15, 1998. <http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Soci/SociZuid.htm>en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/344215-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews three social scientific accounts of the civic sector's role in society: the government failure, contract failure, and voluntary failure theories. All three explain the role of nonprofit organizations as compensating for the market's failure to provide certain collective goods. This approach involves a radical misinterpretation of the underlying principles of civic sector organizations. An account is needed that explains their economy in terms of their normative concerns, rather than explaining normative concerns in terms of their economy. I lay a foundation for such an account by examining (1) the self-understanding among civic sector organizations that they should be "mission-driven," and (2) the implications of this self-understanding for the sector as a "social economy." Whereas "mission-drivenness" calls attention to service-provision, resource-sharing, and open communication as the normative core of civic sector organizations, the notion of a "social economy" suggests a recirculation of money into channels where standard economic logic no longer holds. The key to the civic sector's role lies not in responses to market failure, but in the short-circuiting of a money-driven capitalist economy.en_GB
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhaidea Project Onlineen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Soci/SociZuid.htmen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licenseen_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_GB
dc.subjectCivic sectoren_GB
dc.subjectSocial economyen_GB
dc.subjectNonprofit organizationsen_GB
dc.subjectMarket failureen_GB
dc.subjectMission-drivenen_GB
dc.titleShort Circuits and Market Failure: Theories of the Civic Sectoren
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
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