Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/346409
Title:
Grace as an Aesthetic Concept
Authors:
Smick, Rebekah
Other Titles:
ICS 220103 W15. Grace as an Aesthetic Concept; ICH3758HS L0101 / ICH6758HS L0101. Grace as an Aesthetic Concept
Affiliation:
Institute for Christian Studies
Citation:
Smick, Rebekah. "ICS 220103 W15: Grace as an Aesthetic Concept" (2015). Syllabi. Institute for Christian Studies
Publisher:
Institute for Christian Studies
Issue Date:
Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/346409
Type:
Syllabus
Language:
en
Description:
For much of the Western art tradition, the concept of grace has been an important critical concept for its ability to capture the often elusive quality of artistic affect. Often referred to as the "je ne sais quoi" of art - that something extra that cannot be explained – grace even supplanted beauty for many writers (from Giorgio Vasari to Friedrich Schiller) as the highest artistic ideal. Often missing from modern analyses of the concept, however, are its theological foundations. This seminar style course will exam the concept of grace within its theological, philosophical, literary, and art theoretical contexts in an effort to understand both its historical significance and its potential usefulness for the philosophy of art today. We will look at a variety of texts (e.g. from Plato, Cicero, the Pseudo-Dionysius, Dante, John Calvin, Alexander Pope, Friedrich Schiller, Martin Heidegger) as well as works of art for which grace is an important and defining aesthetic concept.
Keywords:
Grace (Theology); Grace (Aesthetics)
Rights:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Appears in Collections:
Syllabi 2010-2015

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmick, Rebekahen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-09T13:57:31Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-09T13:57:31Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-
dc.identifier.citationSmick, Rebekah. "ICS 220103 W15: Grace as an Aesthetic Concept" (2015). Syllabi. Institute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.otherCourse code: ICS 220103 W15en_GB
dc.identifier.otherCourse code: ICH3758HS L0101 / ICH6758HS L0101en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/346409-
dc.descriptionFor much of the Western art tradition, the concept of grace has been an important critical concept for its ability to capture the often elusive quality of artistic affect. Often referred to as the "je ne sais quoi" of art - that something extra that cannot be explained – grace even supplanted beauty for many writers (from Giorgio Vasari to Friedrich Schiller) as the highest artistic ideal. Often missing from modern analyses of the concept, however, are its theological foundations. This seminar style course will exam the concept of grace within its theological, philosophical, literary, and art theoretical contexts in an effort to understand both its historical significance and its potential usefulness for the philosophy of art today. We will look at a variety of texts (e.g. from Plato, Cicero, the Pseudo-Dionysius, Dante, John Calvin, Alexander Pope, Friedrich Schiller, Martin Heidegger) as well as works of art for which grace is an important and defining aesthetic concept.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licenseen_GB
dc.rightsCopyright, Institute for Christian Studies, all rights reserved.en_GB
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_GB
dc.subjectGrace (Theology)en_GB
dc.subjectGrace (Aesthetics)en_GB
dc.titleGrace as an Aesthetic Concepten
dc.title.alternativeICS 220103 W15. Grace as an Aesthetic Concepten_GB
dc.title.alternativeICH3758HS L0101 / ICH6758HS L0101. Grace as an Aesthetic Concepten_GB
dc.typeSyllabusen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelMWSen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelMAen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelPhDen_GB
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