A Different Tenor: Songs of Love and Sorrow--Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/347380
Title:
A Different Tenor: Songs of Love and Sorrow--Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music
Authors:
Smick, Rebekah; Zuidervaart, Lambert
Abstract:
The question of how music relates to our existence as ethical beings has not always elicited the same response. For much of the twentieth century, the relation between music and ethics was addressed from the angle of music's autonomy. Music was fenced off from society so that it might better fulfill its own internal demands. Thus, in answer to the question whether music has, or should have, an ethical dimension, the predominating philosophical answer of the twentieth century was solidly negative. The article that follows, a response to this negative point of view, reproduces a panel discussion that took place in April 2010 during a conference entitled "Songs of Love and Sorrow: Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music." Co-organized by the Institute for Christian Studies, the Toronto School of Theology, and the Royal Conservatory of Music, the conference attempted to bring to the musical arts a concern to re-evaluate the social significance of artistic experience and practice. Though not argued like an essay, the article highlights significant themes about the relationship of music to ethics, including the innately social character of music, its possible effect on our behaviour, the potential social content of sound itself, the positive social effect of music's ambiguity, the need to break down the barriers between music practitioners and interpreters, the role communities might play in sponsoring the work of musicians, and the possible compatibility between music's formal requirements and its potential for social engagement.
Citation:
Smick, Rebekah and Lambert Zuidervaart. "A Different Tenor: Songs of Love and Sorrow--Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music." Toronto Journal of Theology 27, no. 1 (Spring 2011): 87-106.
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press
Journal:
Toronto Journal of Theology
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10756/347380
DOI:
10.1353/tjt.2011.0018
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Music; Love; Sorrow; Ethics; Society; Songs of Love and Sorrow: Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music Conference (2010 : Toronto, ON); Artistic experience; Artistic practice
ISSN:
1918-6371
Rights holder:
University of Toronto Press. The publisher of this journal does not give us archiving rights to this article
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications; Conference Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmick, Rebekahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZuidervaart, Lamberten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-31T18:24:30Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-31T18:24:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationSmick, Rebekah and Lambert Zuidervaart. "A Different Tenor: Songs of Love and Sorrow--Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music." Toronto Journal of Theology 27, no. 1 (Spring 2011): 87-106.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1918-6371-
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/tjt.2011.0018en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/347380-
dc.description.abstractThe question of how music relates to our existence as ethical beings has not always elicited the same response. For much of the twentieth century, the relation between music and ethics was addressed from the angle of music's autonomy. Music was fenced off from society so that it might better fulfill its own internal demands. Thus, in answer to the question whether music has, or should have, an ethical dimension, the predominating philosophical answer of the twentieth century was solidly negative. The article that follows, a response to this negative point of view, reproduces a panel discussion that took place in April 2010 during a conference entitled "Songs of Love and Sorrow: Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music." Co-organized by the Institute for Christian Studies, the Toronto School of Theology, and the Royal Conservatory of Music, the conference attempted to bring to the musical arts a concern to re-evaluate the social significance of artistic experience and practice. Though not argued like an essay, the article highlights significant themes about the relationship of music to ethics, including the innately social character of music, its possible effect on our behaviour, the potential social content of sound itself, the positive social effect of music's ambiguity, the need to break down the barriers between music practitioners and interpreters, the role communities might play in sponsoring the work of musicians, and the possible compatibility between music's formal requirements and its potential for social engagement.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Toronto Pressen_GB
dc.subjectMusicen_GB
dc.subjectLoveen_GB
dc.subjectSorrowen_GB
dc.subjectEthicsen_GB
dc.subjectSocietyen_GB
dc.subjectSongs of Love and Sorrow: Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music Conference (2010 : Toronto, ON)en_GB
dc.subjectArtistic experienceen_GB
dc.subjectArtistic practiceen_GB
dc.titleA Different Tenor: Songs of Love and Sorrow--Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Musicen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalToronto Journal of Theologyen_GB
dc.rights.holderUniversity of Toronto Press. The publisher of this journal does not give us archiving rights to this articleen_GB
dc.conference.nameSongs of Love and Sorrow: Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music Conference (2010 : Toronto, ON)en_GB
dc.contributor.corporatenameToronto School of Theologyen_GB
dc.contributor.corporatenameRoyal Conservatory of Musicen_GB
dc.contributor.corporatenameInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
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