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The ICS Library welcomes you to our Institutional Repository, where you can explore our digital collections.

The repository facilitates access to our research, creative works, and publications by collecting, sharing and archiving content selected and deposited by our faculty, graduate students and staff.

Faculty, graduate students and staff can use the institutional repository to set up collections and deposit content into the collection. To inquire about establishing a new collection, please contact us at repository@icscanada.edu

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Institute for Christian Studies
Private Collections
  • Something We Don’t See: ICS and the Training of a Messianic Imagination

    Kuipers, Ronald; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-05-11)
  • Perspective vol. 51 no. 2 (Fall 2017)

    Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017-10-31)
  • Perspective vol. 52 no. 1 (Spring 2018)

    Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-04-23)
  • The Allusivity of Grammar: Developing theory and pedagogy for linguistic aesthetics

    Sweetman, Robert; de Boer, Julia Rosalinda; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-01-11)
  • Incarnating the God Who May Be: Christology and Incarnational Humanism in Bonhoeffer and Kearney

    Kuipers, Ron; Novak, Mark Fraser; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017)
    This thesis examines questions of humanity and divinity that are pressing in contemporary philosophy and theology as seen in the thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Richard Kearney. Both these thinkers seek to address issues around transcendence/immanence, sameness/difference, ontology/ethics, and post-metaphysical approaches to God. Chapter one explores the many convergences in their thinking with regards to these topics. Chapter two looks at the main divergence in their thinking: their respective Christologies. Chapter three, following up on the exploration of convergences and divergences in their thought, examines a possible way in which to mediate the difference in their otherwise similar patterns of thinking. The thesis aims, overall, to show that a Christologically-based incarnational humanism is a suitable and appropriate live option that is not only biblical, but also responds to issues in both contemporary philosophy and theology, providing a way to understand how the possibility of divine incarnation depends upon our ongoing human response.

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