• Moral Ontology in the Age of Science: A Philosophical Case for the Mystery of Goodness

      Kuipers, Ronald; Kirby, Joseph Morrill; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-07-16)
      In this dissertation, I attempt to convince an audience of modern naturalists that Socrates’ famous moral thesis—that we should prefer to suffer injustice rather than inflict it, because it is impossible for an unjust person to be happy—is true. Rather than logical proof, however, I focus on questions of rhetoric and of spiritual practice. In short, I argue that the existential truth of Socrates’ claim only begins to manifest for those who adopt a particular curriculum of spiritual training, which combines the pursuit of moral goodness with the pursuit of self-knowledge; this training, however, needs to be undertaken under the aegis of a philosophical rhetoric that first opens us to at least the possibility that Socrates might be right. In the first two chapters of this dissertation, therefore, I focus on rhetoric, as the attempt to destabilize the common naturalist confidence that their own scientific worldview is grounded on the true nature of reality, and that this unprecedented understanding shows Socrates’ moral thesis to be nonsense. Following this, from chapters three to five, I present the aforementioned spiritual curriculum: the “spirituality from above,” oriented towards moral goodness, in contradistinction to the “spirituality from below” that is oriented toward self-knowledge. After presenting the logic of this bivalent practice in chapter three, I then explicate it with reference to the philosophies of David Hume and Richard Rorty (chapter four), and then Plato and Nietzsche (chapter five). Finally, in chapter six, I consider what accepting the truth of Socrates’ moral thesis would mean for the way we live our everyday lives, under conditions of peace, in which the question of whether to suffer or inflict injustice will likely not be a pressing existential concern, and the question of what it actually means to be just will always be unclear and disputed.
    • Something We Don’t See: ICS and the Training of a Messianic Imagination

      Kuipers, Ronald; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-05-11)
    • Perspective vol. 52 no. 1 (Spring 2018)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-04-23)
    • Perspective vol. 51 no. 2 (Fall 2017)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017-10-31)
    • The Allusivity of Grammar: Developing theory and pedagogy for linguistic aesthetics

      Sweetman, Robert; de Boer, Julia Rosalinda; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-01-11)
    • Incarnating the God Who May Be: Christology and Incarnational Humanism in Bonhoeffer and Kearney

      Kuipers, Ron; Novak, Mark Fraser; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017)
      This thesis examines questions of humanity and divinity that are pressing in contemporary philosophy and theology as seen in the thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Richard Kearney. Both these thinkers seek to address issues around transcendence/immanence, sameness/difference, ontology/ethics, and post-metaphysical approaches to God. Chapter one explores the many convergences in their thinking with regards to these topics. Chapter two looks at the main divergence in their thinking: their respective Christologies. Chapter three, following up on the exploration of convergences and divergences in their thought, examines a possible way in which to mediate the difference in their otherwise similar patterns of thinking. The thesis aims, overall, to show that a Christologically-based incarnational humanism is a suitable and appropriate live option that is not only biblical, but also responds to issues in both contemporary philosophy and theology, providing a way to understand how the possibility of divine incarnation depends upon our ongoing human response.
    • A Theology of Grace in Six Controversies, by Edward T. Oakes, S. J., Eerdmans

      Vanderleek, Ethan; Institute for Christian Studies; Regent College (2017-07)
    • Perspective vol. 51 no. 1 (Spring 2017)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017-05-08)
    • Annual Report 2015-2016 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Blomberg, Doug; Kuipers, Ronald A.; Yett, Danielle; Tucker, M. Ansley; Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-12)
    • Review of Thomas Aquinas: Faith, Reason, and Following Christ, by Frederick Christian Bauerschmidt.

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (University of Chicago. Divinity School.; University of Chicago. Federated Theological Faculty, 2016-10)
    • Perspective vol. 50 no. 2 (Autumn 2016)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-10-31)
    • Academic Calendar, 2004-2005

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (2004)
    • Academic Calendar, 2003-2004

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (2003)
    • Academic Calendar, 2002-2003

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (2002)
    • Academic Calendar, 2000-2001

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (2000)
    • Academic Calendar, 1990-1992

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (1990)
    • Academic Calendar, 1988-1990

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (1988)
    • Academic Bulletin, 1984-1986

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (1984)
    • Academic Bulletin, 1982-1984

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (1982)
    • Academic Bulletin, 1980-1982

      Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (1980)