• Annual Report 2017-2018 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Strauss, Gideon; Acero Ferrer, Héctor; Valk, John; Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-12)
    • Perspective vol. 52 no. 2 (Fall 2018)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-10-29)
    • Something We Don’t See: ICS and the Training of a Messianic Imagination

      Kuipers, Ronald; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-05-11)
    • Perspective vol. 52 no. 1 (Spring 2018)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-04-23)
    • The Allusivity of Grammar: Developing theory and pedagogy for linguistic aesthetics

      Sweetman, Robert; de Boer, Julia Rosalinda; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-01-11)
    • Perspective vol. 51 no. 2 (Fall 2017)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017-10-31)
    • A Theology of Grace in Six Controversies, by Edward T. Oakes, S. J., Eerdmans

      Vanderleek, Ethan; Institute for Christian Studies; Regent College (2017-07)
    • Perspective vol. 51 no. 1 (Spring 2017)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017-05-08)
    • Incarnating the God Who May Be: Christology and Incarnational Humanism in Bonhoeffer and Kearney

      Kuipers, Ron; Novak, Mark Fraser; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017)
      This thesis examines questions of humanity and divinity that are pressing in contemporary philosophy and theology as seen in the thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Richard Kearney. Both these thinkers seek to address issues around transcendence/immanence, sameness/difference, ontology/ethics, and post-metaphysical approaches to God. Chapter one explores the many convergences in their thinking with regards to these topics. Chapter two looks at the main divergence in their thinking: their respective Christologies. Chapter three, following up on the exploration of convergences and divergences in their thought, examines a possible way in which to mediate the difference in their otherwise similar patterns of thinking. The thesis aims, overall, to show that a Christologically-based incarnational humanism is a suitable and appropriate live option that is not only biblical, but also responds to issues in both contemporary philosophy and theology, providing a way to understand how the possibility of divine incarnation depends upon our ongoing human response.
    • Annual Report 2016-2017 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Blomberg, Doug; Kuipers, Ronald A.; Smick, Rebekah; Valk, John; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017)
    • Annual Report 2015-2016 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Blomberg, Doug; Kuipers, Ronald A.; Yett, Danielle; Tucker, M. Ansley; Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-12)
    • Perspective vol. 50 no. 2 (Autumn 2016)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-10-31)
    • M.C. Smit Collection. Student Records Collection. Fond 001-0010.

      Rudisill, Daniel; Institute for Christian Studies (2016-10-22)
    • Review of Thomas Aquinas: Faith, Reason, and Following Christ, by Frederick Christian Bauerschmidt.

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (University of Chicago. Divinity School.; University of Chicago. Federated Theological Faculty, 2016-10)
    • The Herman Dooyeweerd Library Collection: Author-Title Citations

      Institute for Christian Studies. Library; Guthrie-McNaughton, Isabella; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-10)
    • ICS Agrees to Sale of Long-Time Home, But Will Stay as Tenant

      Unknown; Christian Courier (Christian Courier, 2016-06)
    • Unwrapping the Gift: Empty Notion or Valuable Concept?

      Sweetman, Robert; Polce, Jonathon Emil; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-05)
      The concept of the gift has received ample philosophical attention in recent decades. Thinkers such as Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Marion have been major contributors to the conversation philosophically. However, their conclusions around the gift -- while generating many fruitful notions -- leave the gift impoverished from our ordinary experience. Further, their reflections make it difficult to predicated giftedness of existence. This thesis argues for a need to rethink the gift along different lines which seeks to widen the gift in order to be able to predicate it of existence. In order to make such an argument, the ideas of Kenneth Schmitz on the gift are recovered. Schmitz argues for an understanding of giftedness that includes a notion of reciprocity and receptivity -- contra Marion and Derrida. It is this notion of receptivity that makes Schmitz' framework able to be predicated of existence. Existence, understood as gifted, opens up fruitful avenues for anthropology and ethics, as well as argues for a certain disposition towards reality that is centered in wonder and gratitude.
    • Christian Institutions Without Pillars

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (Christian Courier, 2016-04-25)
    • Perspective vol. 50 no. 1 (Spring 2016)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-04-18)
    • "In the Embrace of Absolute Life": A Reading of Christology and Selfhood in Michel Henry's "Christian Trilogy"

      Ansell, Nicholas; Vanderleek, Ethan P.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-04)
      Michel Henry (1922-2002) was a leading 20th century French philosopher in the school of phenomenology. The final three books of his career focus on explicitly Christian themes and texts, and these books are now known as his “Christian trilogy”. This essay focuses on this trilogy in an exposition of Henry’s Christology, his concept of the Self, and how Christology and selfhood relate to each other. The exposition of Henry’s thought on this issue is stated in the following thesis, broken into three sections: 1) God always reveals himself as Christ 2) who reveals the Truth of the Self, 3) this revelation being identical with salvation. Said again, 1) God’s Revelation is always God’s self-revelation in Christ, and is never separate from 2) the human condition of the Self as a Son of God, and this condition is never separate from 3) salvation. Revelation, selfhood, and salvation. This essay is largely expository but several constructive attempts are made to apply Henry’s philosophy of Christianity to key theological themes, namely atonement, pneumatology, and ecclesiology.