• Action, Love, and the World: An Inquiry Into the Political Relevance of Christian Charity (With Constant Reference to Hannah Arendt)

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Tebbutt, Andrew; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2013-03-21)
      In The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt identifies the central principle that has defined Christian communities since their earliest appearance as “worldlessness.” On Arendt’s analysis, Christianity has always tended to found relations between people on charity, a virtue that, due to its affiliation with the anti-political experience of passionate love, is incapable of serving as the basis of any public realm or common political world. This thesis aims to reconcile the virtue of charity to Arendt’s political vision on the basis of a reconsideration of love’s “worldlessness.” In the first two chapters, I characterize Arendt as a political thinker and provide an account of her ideas of political action and the common world. In the third chapter, I place Arendt’s understanding of the world in dialogue with Jean-Luc Marion’s phenomenological account of charity, which dissociates charity from the idea of passion and presents it as an act of will through which one resolves to see past the simple objectivity of the world and to perceive the invisible “flesh” or personhood of others. Charity is “worldless”—and thus crucial to an Arendtian understanding of politics—in the sense that it looks beyond what the world automatically makes present in order to “see” the other person and to invite her voice into the common world of speech and action.
    • Advent (Four Weeks)

      Sweetman, Robert; Carr, Allyson; Kuipers, Ronald A.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2014)
    • Albert the Great, Meister Eckhart and Women's Spirituality

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)
    • 'All That Man Has and Is' : a Study of the Historiographical Concerns Guiding the Work of Christopher Dawson

      Sweetman, Robert; Greydanus, Richard; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2008-08)
      This thesis presents the historiographical concerns guiding the work of Christopher Dawson, Roman Catholic historian, sociologist, and philosopher of history, in terms of a science of human being, which is adequate to conceptualize human activity in time. The author attempts to show that Dawson rejects the modern, empirical paradigm, both for its secularity and its reconceptualization of the relation between time and human activity in history. A conceptual continuity Dawson sees between the work of modern empirical thinkers G.W.F. Hegel, Karl Marx, and Friedrich Nietzsche, and its consequences for understanding history as a teleological process, or the progress of Reason, consciousness, Spirit, self-overcoming, etc., is treated in the first section. Dawson's account of the natural conditions of human knowing, and its relation to his theory of culture, is treated in the second section. And in the final section, Dawson's understanding of the relation between religion and culture is presented.
    • The Allusivity of Grammar: Developing theory and pedagogy for linguistic aesthetics

      Sweetman, Robert; de Boer, Julia Rosalinda; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-01-11)
    • An Analysis and Evalutation of Cornelius Van Til's Doctrine of Common Grace

      Olthuis, James H.; Pavlischek, Keith J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1984-11)
    • Anaximander and the Relation Between Myth and Philosophy in the Sixth Century B.C.

      Wolters, Albert M.; Rowe, William V.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1979)
      This paper is a study of the pre-Socratic, Milesian philosopher Anaximander, in light of the question concerning the rise of philosophy and its relation to myth in the sixth century B.C. We are restricting our inquiry to Anaximander to make our consideration of the myth/philosophy relation more manageable. Thus we will assume that Anaximander's thought is indicative of the general status of this relationship in his time and milieu. We chose Anaximander also because of the great diversity of interpretations of his thought in current pre-Socratic scholarship. Differences in approach to Anaximander reflect differences concerning the nature of pre-Socratic thought in general. Differences with regard to the pre-Socratics in turn reflect ultimate assumptions as to the nature of philosophy and the historical circumstances in which it arose. Therefore, a considerable part of our study will concern itself with the major Anaximander-interpretations in the literature, their key assumptions and their relationships to existing traditions in pre-Socratic research. This part of the study will be carried out in preparation for our own interpretation of Anaximander and the relation between myth and philosophy visible in his thought. The latter will be conducted in dialogue with the other interpretations and with a conscious awareness of its own hermeneutical assumptions.
    • Annual Report 2013-2014 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2014)
    • Annual Report 2014-2015 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-11-16)
    • Annual Report 2015-2016 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Blomberg, Doug; Kuipers, Ronald A.; Yett, Danielle; Tucker, M. Ansley; Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2016-12)
    • Annual Report 2016-2017 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Blomberg, Doug; Kuipers, Ronald A.; Smick, Rebekah; Valk, John; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2017)
    • Annual Report 2017-2018 (Institute for Christian Studies)

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Strauss, Gideon; Acero Ferrer, Héctor; Valk, John; Institute for Christian Studies; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-12)
    • ART in Orvieto Summer Intensive

      Smick, Rebekah; Gordon College. Studio for Art, Faith and History; Institute for Christian Studies; Roorda, Paul; Terpstra, John (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)
    • At What Price? The Fruits of Truth as Agreeable Leading

      Hart, Hendrik; Klemp, Mathew E.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1996-08)
    • Before or Outside the Text: A Comparative Study on Jean-Luc Marion and Paul Ricoeur's Idea of Revelation

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Tang, Joseph; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2010-05)
      This essay explores the idea of revelation of two French philosophers, Jean-Luc Marion and Paul Ricoeur. Ricoeur and Marion are very important figures not only in contemporary continental philosophy, but also in their contributions to the discussion of religion, or what some may call the "theological turn." Marion contends that revelation is the saturated phenomenon ' par excellence', free from the constraints of reason and metaphysics. For Ricoeur, a longer route in approaching the phenomenology of religion through the detour of hermeneutics is much needed. Such a longer path serves to concretely ground the discussion of revelation in a historic, linguistic, and textual milieu. Therefore, while Marion thinks that revelation is immediate and unconditionally given, Ricoeur maintains that revelation as manifestation names the possibility for biblical Scripture, and through hermeneutic interpretation, is able to open a world into which one might project one's ownmost possibilities.
    • Being and Being Known: the Place of Revelation in a Marcelian Ontology

      Olthuis, James H.; Wells, Jeffrey; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1987)
    • Beliefs and the Scientific Enterprise: a Framework Model Based on Kuhn's Paradigms, Polanyi's Commitment Framework, and Radnitzky's Internal Steering Fields

      Hart, Hendrik; Joldersma, Clarence W.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1983)
      In this thesis I attempt to develop an alternative to the logical positivist's image of science, which attempts to exclude beliefs from scientific investigations. First I set the problem up by describing what the positivists mean by belief and how they attempt to exclude belief through the use of the scientific method. I begin to develop an alternative by examining the views of three philosophers of science: Thomas S. Kuhn, Michael Polanyi, and Gerard Radnitzky. Each of them provides an alternative to the positivistic conception of science by suggesting that scientific research is surrounded by a framework of tacit beliefs. I present each view in the following way. First I describe the background and context for the framework hypothesis; then I explain the framework itself, including discussions on the nature of the framework, how it is acquired, its role in visible scientific activity, and how switches from one framework to another occur; finally I assess each person's insights, including each's relevance for my thesis. The examination of these views sets the stage for my last chapter. Here I briefly compare the three thinkers, noting similarities and differences. Then I highlight each thinker's unique insights. Finally, I present a brief description of what I believe is a viable alternative to the positivistic image of science, based on the work of the three philosophers.
    • Bernard of Clairvaux on the Song of Songs: a Contemporary Encounter With Contemplative Aspirations

      Sweetman, Robert; Mols, Michael John; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2007-08)
      Recent scholarship in biblical interpretation has remained suspicious of the "allegorical" approach to scripture, presumed as common to Medieval Christianity, and Bernard of Clairvaux is often acknowledged as paradigmatic of contemplative exegesis. Bernard's Sermons on the Song of Songs is often alleged to be an ultimate example of the dangers of monastic "allegorizing," in that such an approach lacks any consistency of method and maintains an ideological stance that is suspicious of and ultimately rejects the nature of bodily existence. This thesis counters these claims by utilizing the work of contemporary medievalists, instead of contemporary biblical exegetes, as a lens in a close reading of Bernard's Sermones Super Cantica, as well as his textual interaction with Peter Abelard and Peter the Venerable. This thesis suggests that Bernard is consistent in his method of performative reading and holds bodily existence as vital to the monastic and broader Christian way of life.
    • Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment Unto Salvation in the Book of Revelation

      Ansell, Nicholas; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2015-01)
    • Bonhoeffer and Berkouwer On the World, Humans, and Sin: Two Models of Ontology and Anthropology

      Olthuis, James H.; Bouma-Prediger, Steven; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1984-06)