• "I believe in the resurrection of the body"

      Blomberg, Doug; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2019-05-17)
      “I believe in the resurrection of the body.” This fundamental tenet of the Christian faith extends beyond belief and into every corner of life. It provides the basis from which we might understand our whole selves as whole selves--to take into account where we are in body, heart, mind, and action. In terms of a guiding idea for curriculum development and for education, this statement calls us to see ourselves and others in primarily relational terms; to value people’s integral and multivalent relationships and all aspects of who, where, and what they are. Such an approach leads to a view of education--and of the human person--inextricably developed “from the ground up.”
    • Something We Don’t See: ICS and the Training of a Messianic Imagination

      Kuipers, Ronald; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2018-05-11)
    • Review of Thomas Aquinas: Faith, Reason, and Following Christ, by Frederick Christian Bauerschmidt.

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (University of Chicago. Divinity School.; University of Chicago. Federated Theological Faculty, 2016-10)
    • Christian Institutions Without Pillars

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (Christian Courier, 2016-04-25)
    • The Legacy of Herman Dooyeweerd: Reflections on Critical Philosophy in the Christian Tradition

      Wolters, Albert M.; Olthuis, James H.; Seerveld, Calvin; McIntire, C. T.; Marshall, Paul; Hart, Hendrik; McIntire, C. T.; Institute for Christian Studies (University Press of America, 1985)
    • Stained Glass: Worldviews and Social Science

      Wolters, Albert M.; Olthuis, James H.; Klapwijk, Jacob; Wolterstorff, Nicholas; Griffioen, Sander; Verhoogt, Jan; Drenth, P. J. D.; Rowe, William; Marshall, Paul; Marshall, Paul A.; Griffioen, Sander; Mouw, Richard J.; Institute for Christian Studies (University Press of America, 1989)
    • Remembrance That Limps: Remembering and Forgiving With Our Crooked Human Hearts

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (Cardus, 2015-12)
    • Meeting God: the Relay Race of Generations

      Kirby, Joseph Morrill; Institute for Christian Studies (Christian Courier, 2015-10-26)
    • Working Through the Trauma of Evil: An Interview With Richard Kearney

      Kirby, Joseph Morrill; Institute for Christian Studies (Cascade Books, 2012)
      In this interview, the Irish philosopher Richard Kearney explores the human experience of evil and the role of the human imagination in responding to this evil. Kearney focuses on the healing steps people may take in order to "work through" traumatic experience, steps that include remembering, narrative retelling, and mourning. Such working through, he says, can turn melancholia to mourning, thus allowing those who have experienced suffering and loss to "give a future to their past" and, in so doing, to "go on."
    • Artistic Truth, Linguistically Turned: Variations on a Theme From Adorno, Habermas, and Hart

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Kuipers, Ronald Alexander; Wesselius, Janet Catherina; Institute for Christian Studies (University Press of AmericaLanham, MD, 2002)
    • Good Cities or Cities for the Good? Radical Augustinians, Societal Structures, and Normative Critique

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Smith, James K. A.; Olthuis, James H.; Institute for Christian Studies (Baker Academic, a division of Baker PublishingGrand Rapids, Mich., 2005)
    • Art, the Bible and

      Seerveld, Calvin; Vanhoozer, Kevin J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Baker Academic, a division of Baker PublishingGrand Rapids, Mich., 2005)
    • Thinking Deeply About Our Faith

      Seerveld, Calvin; Institute for Christian Studies (CRC Publications, 2008-11)
    • On (Not) Accepting Reality: Introducing The Annihilation of Hell

      Ansell, Nicholas; Institute for Christian Studies (CPRSE, 2015-05-27)
    • Exempla and the Promotion of Religious Identity: Gerard of Frachet's Vitae Fratrum

      Sweetman, Robert; Goering, Joseph; Guardiani, Francesco; Silano, Giulio; Institute for Christian Studies (LEGASNew York, 2008)
      This paper will examine the pedagogy of the exemplary vignette as a means of "mass" identity formation within the Dominican Order and among its far flung support­ers. In the process, I make the case that Cistercian Conrad of Eberbach's earlier Exor­dium Magnum provided a model for a Dominican "memory" and the identity that shared memory was to ensure.
    • Love, Understanding and the Mystical Knowledge of God

      Sweetman, Robert; Goering, Joseph; Guardiani, Francesco; Silano, Giulio; Institute for Christian Studies (LEGASNew York, 2002)
      I propose to explore the relationship between love, understanding and mysti­cal knowledge of God in Eckhart. It contrasts as it must to the "voluntarism" of the Bernadine tradition. So how does Eckhart see God in mystical union with, as he calls it, "the eyes of love"?
    • Reunite Devotion, Confessional Literacy and Christian Action

      Sweetman, Robert; Institute for Christian Studies (Christian Courier, 2015-04-27)
    • The Walking Dead Meets the Resurrection

      Ansell, Nicholas; Institute for Christian Studies (CPRSE, 2015-04-06)
    • Understanding Our World: an Integral Ontology

      Hart, Hendrik; Institute for Christian Studies (University Press of AmericaLanham, Md., 1984)
    • A Different Tenor: Songs of Love and Sorrow--Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music

      Smick, Rebekah; Zuidervaart, Lambert; Toronto School of Theology; Royal Conservatory of Music; Institute for Christian Studies (University of Toronto Press, 2011)
      The question of how music relates to our existence as ethical beings has not always elicited the same response. For much of the twentieth century, the relation between music and ethics was addressed from the angle of music's autonomy. Music was fenced off from society so that it might better fulfill its own internal demands. Thus, in answer to the question whether music has, or should have, an ethical dimension, the predominating philosophical answer of the twentieth century was solidly negative. The article that follows, a response to this negative point of view, reproduces a panel discussion that took place in April 2010 during a conference entitled "Songs of Love and Sorrow: Re-Engaging the Social Ethics of Music." Co-organized by the Institute for Christian Studies, the Toronto School of Theology, and the Royal Conservatory of Music, the conference attempted to bring to the musical arts a concern to re-evaluate the social significance of artistic experience and practice. Though not argued like an essay, the article highlights significant themes about the relationship of music to ethics, including the innately social character of music, its possible effect on our behaviour, the potential social content of sound itself, the positive social effect of music's ambiguity, the need to break down the barriers between music practitioners and interpreters, the role communities might play in sponsoring the work of musicians, and the possible compatibility between music's formal requirements and its potential for social engagement.