• Metaphoric Truth: Seeing and Saying in Merleau-Ponty and Ricoeur, and a Broader Ethics Via Zuidervaart

      Smick, Rebekah; Read, Janet; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2010)
      Artistic meaning via visual art and literary fiction is debated in modern aesthetic thought. Language is a cognitive component in postmodernist aesthetic projects. This thesis investigates Maurice Merleau-Ponty's and Paul Ricoeur's writings on painting and language, respectively, whose phenomenological aim is the revelation of being in works of the imagination in tandem with Lambert Zuidervaart's approach to artistic truth which opens the lifeworld to the biotic context of the earth. For him, imaginative disclosure is integral to techno-scientific and art realms. Embodiment, natality, and expression illuminate the problematic of meaning in forms of postmodern visual art. Metaphoric imagination and metaphor are used for metaphor is a principle of articulation, not a figure of speech. Aesthetic projects connect with the lifeworld in a hermeneutic circle of meaning.
    • The Miracle of Nature and the Nature of Miracle: a Study of the Thought of J. H. Diemer Concerning Creation and Miracle

      Olthuis, James H.; Gousmett, Chris; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1985-04)
    • Musicology or Musikwissenschaft? A Study of the Work of Carl Dahlhaus

      Seerveld, Calvin; Douglas, Barbara Jo; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1991-10)
    • Mutilated Music: Towards an After Auschwitz Aesthetic

      Sweetman, Robert; Cuthill, Chris; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1999)
    • Natality From Chaos: Hannah Arendt and Democratic Education

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Van Dyk, Tricia K.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2006-08)
      This thesis considers contemporary education from a philosophical angle via the work of Hannah Arendt in light of education's key place a the intersection of responsibility for the past, empowerment to effect change in the present, and hope for the future. Chapter 1 sets out an understanding of human community as a chaotic system in the technical sense via Arendt's concept of natality, applying this understanding to the project of education as a way of helping educators facilitate students' ability to contribute something new without controlling students' potentially unique contributions. Chapter 2 questions in more detail the applicability of some of Arendt's philosophical and political ideas to multicultural education, addressing also the need for setting goals for action without assuming a deterministic, mathematically linear process. Chapter 3 examines Arendt's firm distinction between education and politics in the context of globalization and the possibility of continual renewal and transformation of our world.
    • Natural Healing In Biblical Perspective: It's Contribution to Health Care

      Olthuis, James H.; Lysander, Nesamoni; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1989-09)
    • The Nature of Critical Theory and Its Fate: Adorno vs. Habermas, Ltd.

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Klaassen, Matthew J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2005-10)
      Jurgen Habermas argues for a paradigm change in critical theory from Theodor W. Adorno's philosophy of consciousness to his own linguistically-turned theory. Habermas claims that Adorno's conception of reason sets up an antagonistic relationship between subject and object that can only be overcome by a non-rational mimesis with nature. This thesis defends Adorno against Habermas, and argues that the linguistic turn is a mistake. Chapter 1 outlines Habermas's critique, and corrects some of his specific misunderstandings of Adorno. Chapter 2 offers a positive defense of Adorno. By means of an expanded notion of nature, Adorno shows how the relation between subject and object need not be the antagonistic one characteristic of so much of modern philosophy. Chapter 3 argues that it is not Adorno's dialectical thought, but Habermas's linguistically-turned critical theory that suffers from an inability properly to articulate the relation between subject and object.
    • Not Ideas About the Thing But the Thing Itself: Thomas Reid's Epistemology in the Light of Artistotle's "De Anima"

      Sweetman, Robert; DeMoor, Michael; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2003-09)
      This thesis argues that, in spite of his explicit denunciation of Aristotle's theory of perception and thought, Thomas Reid's own theory of perception marks a return to the central themes of Aristotle's theory. It is argued, first, that Aristotle's 'De Anima' presents an account of sensation and thought in which the functions of the object of perception play the determining role with respect to the structure, order and intelligibility of the act of perception. Thomas Aquinas' and Descartes' transformation of Aristotle's account are then discussed, showing how the "apparatus" of Aristotle's theory remains while the ground of order and intelligibility is shifted from the functions of the object of perception to those of the perceiver as subject. The theories of the British empiricists are then shown to be continuous with this transformation of Aristotle's thought. Finally, it is argued that Reid returns to an objectivism by way of his rejection of the subjectivistic transformation wrought by Descartes et al. It is argued that this rejection is not---as Reid himself believes---a rejection of the crucial aspects of Aristotle's theory, but instead constitutes a return to its primary themes and theses.
    • Not Very Modern But Very Twentieth Century: An Interpretation Of Jose Ortega Y Gasset's Categories For Art Historiography

      Seerveld, Calvin; Luttikhuizen, Henry Martin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1986)
    • On the Problem of Common Ground: Van Til, Dooyeweerd and Thomas Kuhn

      Hart, Hendrik; Lee, Joongjae; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2001)
    • Operationalizing and Quantification: Some Methodological Problems in Recent Social Science

      Zylstra, Bernard; Marshall, Paul A.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1980-06)
    • Owen Barfield's Aesthetics: Worldview and Poetic Consciousness

      Seerveld, Calvin; Davies, Lloyd; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1986-06)
    • Paul Tillich: His Anthropology As Key To The Structure Of His Thought

      Olthuis, James H.; Tollefson, Terry Ray; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1977-05)
    • Peter L. Berger's Theory of Sociology of Knowledge and Its Implications for His Understanding of Third World Society

      Marshall, Paul A.; Saher, Iskandar Kisman; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1992-10)
    • Philosophical Anthropology: An Interpretive Analysis of Paul Ricoeur's Philosophy of Will

      Olthuis, James H.; Venema, Henry I.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1986)
    • Photography, Science, Art

      Seerveld, Calvin; Robertson, Hamish; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1998)
    • Phronesis, Tradition, Logos and Context: a Reading of Gadamer's Philosophical Hermeneutics

      Olthuis, James H.; Friesen, Henry; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2000-07)
    • Political Tolerance Of "Religious" Differences: An Exposition and Critique of the Lockean Theory, With An Alternative Approach

      Marshall, Paul A.; Duim, Gary; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1986-08)
    • The Politics of Jesus and the Power of Creation

      Ansell, Nicholas John; Parler, Branson L.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2005)
      This study examines the theology and social ethics of John Howard Yoder with a view toward how creation and redemption are related in his theology. The first chapter examines Yoder's aversion to certain construals of creation and argues that he is not inherently hostile to creation as such, but is cautious with respect to the possible abuse of creation as a theological and ethical category. The second chapter evaluates the nature of the state in Yoder's theology, examines his view of the Powers in this context, and argues that his view of redemption can be seen as a restoration of an eschatologically open creation. The third chapter compares Yoder's theology and social ethics with those of J. Richard Middleton, arguing that there may be a potential for interconnection between Yoder's Anabaptistic focus on the politics of Jesus and Middleton's Reformational emphasis upon the goodness of the power of creation seen in the imago Dei of Genesis I.
    • Popper, Darwinism and Third World Evolutionary Epistemology: an Exposition and Critique

      Wolters, Albert M.; Roques, Mark Seymour; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1986)