• Eric A. Havelock and the Origins of Philosophy

      Rowe, William V.; Fisher, Jeremy Eleazer; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1991-09)
    • Ernst Troeltsch's Final Phase of Thought: Historical Methodology

      Wolters, Albert M.; Rogers, Robert Harris; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1981-08)
    • Eros and Agape in the Sexual Ethics of Helmut Thielicke

      Zylstra, Bernard; Olthuis, James H.; Malarkey, Robert L.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1980-08)
    • Evolutionary Monism: The Continuity of John Hick's Thought

      Olthuis, James H.; Shaw, Stephen; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1985-08)
    • Excess, Sex & Elevation

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Shuker, Ronald Kurt; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2006-01)
      Excess, Sex & Elevation is an attempt to understand the desire for truth in the work of Emmanuel Levinas, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Nothing is said about what truth is, but rather why it is wanted and how it is sought. Despite their different religious beliefs (Levinas a Jew, Nietzsche an atheist, Dostoevsky a Christian), the three thinkers hold remarkably similar conceptions of truth. Truth is an individual pursuit -- upwards. The self experiences a crisis of conscience upon discovering its originary excess, which is sex. The self suffers spiritually for what it is physically through the art of ascesis, turning the lust for sex into the desire for truth. And therein begins the self's elevation to the heights of truth.
    • Faith in Search of a Focus: an Integral Critique of the Faith Development Theory of James Fowler

      Olthuis, James H.; Chapko, John J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1985-08)
    • The Fall Into Modernity

      Hart, Hendrik; Douglas, Nigel Charles; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1989-05)
    • Freedom Un/Limited: a Sympathetic Critique of Libertarian Freedom in the Open Theism of Clark Pinnock

      Ansell, Nicholas John; Hocking, Jeffrey S.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2008-12)
      This thesis lays out a critique of the libertarian autonomy in Clark Pinnock's open theism. It contends that libertarian autonomy (defined as the choice to do otherwise) is unable to do justice to the fuller sense of freedom described in the biblical narrative. Offering more than a critique, this thesis suggests an alternative definition of freedom by qualifying Karl Barth's "freedom as obedience" as 'freedom as faithfulness'. As such, true freedom is contrasted to the autonomy that leads to evil, and is found beyond the false dichotomy of compatibilism and incompatibilism, heteronomy and autonomy. Freedom is recognized as a good gift of creation and a promise of the eschaton, and thus must be distanced from the shadow of evil which haunts human autonomy. Ultimately, this thesis contends that faithfulness to God as the source and call of life leads to responsive, transformative, and eschatologically unlimited freedom.
    • From Ground to Ocean: Robinson and Keller at the Beginnings of Divinity

      Ansell, Nicholas John; Basden, Stuart Jeffrey; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2007-09)
      Observing the movement in recent Christian theology, I examine the change in depth metaphors and theological works, as they move from tendencies of solidity and proposition-forming, to more fluid imaginations in their substance and style. I conduct an indirect comparison between John A.T. Robinson and Catherine Keller, engaging Buber, Tillich and Virginia Mollenkott, specifically focusing on themes of depth and working through a filter of social and ecological justice.Throughout the essay I acknowledge the importance of the continuing re-articulation of theology, the necessity of exploring the roots of Christianity, and I affirm the need for new language for the task of articulating an appropriate image of divinity and humanity. I contend that while Keller is well able to continue Robinson's theological project for the next generation, his work is still valuable in contributing Christology and New Testament studies, both of these being somewhat absent from Keller's work.
    • From Paradox to Possibility: Gauging the Unique Contribution of Christian Voices to the Public Discussion of Ecological Crisis

      Kuipers, Ronald A.; Gerritsma, Sara L.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2008-12)
      This thesis argues that western societies are caught in a paradox: Individuals and groups are increasingly concerned about the harmful effects humanity is having on the earth's health, while at the same time environmental degradation increases and societies are doing relatively little to stop environmentally harmful actions. Chapter 1 explores the deeper roots of our current situation, arguing that westerners are caught up in a harmful ideology that prioritizes economic growth and material prosperity at all costs, which means that steps to protect the environment will not be undertaken if these steps will have negative (or even neutral) impacts on economic growth. Suggesting a theocentric (God-centered) alternative to this harmful ideology, chapter 2 defends the expression of openly religious perspectives in the public political discussions of environmental crises but also emphasizes the responsibility of all participants to dialogue in a respectful, civil manner and to be open to truths coming from marginal perspectives. Finally, chapter 3 gives a number of concrete suggestions for public policies that can address the roots of ecological degradation and engage citizens who are ready and willing to take steps to reduce their environmental footprint.
    • Hannah Arendt and the Disappearance of the Political in the Modern Age

      Zylstra, Bernard; Koyzis, David Theodore; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1982-01)
    • Hart and Plantinga On Our Knowledge of God

      Hart, Hendrik; Huisman, John; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2004-08)
      The thesis explores and takes a stand with respect to the differences between the religious epistemologies of Alvin Plantinga and Hendrik Hart. For Plantinga, direct rational knowledge of God "in Himself" is possible because it is grounded in the experience of our rational faculties. For Hart, direct rational knowledge of God's nature is impossible because God transcends the created order and, therefore, the limits of rational understanding. Our knowledge of God, as a consequence, can only be faith knowledge that is decidedly indirect and metaphoric in nature. Plantinga believes that such views are Kantian in inspiration and that they turn our knowledge of God into nothing more than rationally incoherent "disguised nonsense." The thesis shows that Plantinga's own philosophical theology fails to meet the rational standards he sets for religious knowledge, his critique of Kantian religious epistemologies fails to apply to Hart's position, and that he himself allows for indirect knowledge of God in certain instances. The thesis concludes by noting if our knowledge of God can be indirect in some instances without also being rationally incoherent disguised nonsense, then perhaps Hart is not wrong for regarding it to be indirect in all instances.
    • Human Action and Economics in the Liberal Thought of Ludwig Von Mises

      Zylstra, Bernard; Clemenger, Bruce J.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1986)
    • Imaginatively Constructing God Concepts: Exploring the Role of Imagination in Gordon Kaufman's Theological Method

      Olthuis, James H.; Hildebrand, Glenda; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1988-08)
    • In or After Eden? Creation, Fall, and Interpretation

      Olthuis, James H.; Smith, James K. A.; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1995-08)
    • An Introduction to Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Seminars 1 and 2

      Olthuis, James H.; Martin, Noah; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2008-01)
      My thesis is an introduction to Lacanian Psychoanalysis--and assumes all of the connotations of the word "introduction". I have tried to make it as clear and simple as possible, constantly reiterating each point in hopes that the reader will find some sort of conceptual handle in which to gain access to Lacan's world. This thesis begins with an attempt to situate the Lacanian project in its historical and theoretical context. I proffer the contributing factors that led Lacan to initiate his Seminar followed by the theoretical tasks he wished to accomplish therein. I then transition into a discussion dealing with the underlying mechanisms of language that form Jacques Lacan's specific strand of psychoanalysis.With Lacan's understanding of the functioning of the signifier in place I shift into a topological discussion of the individual symbolic concepts crucial to an understanding of the nature of Lacanian psychoanalysis. Throughout this discussion I endeavor to show how the concepts interrelate and influence the formation of all the parts of the nascent amorphous theoretical whole; all the while drawing on examples from popular culture in order to illustrate these concepts to the non-specialized reader.In the third and final section of the thesis I discuss how these concepts are manifest in the psychoanalytic practice--the actually existing analytic session. I venture a guess at how these concepts effect the work of the analyst and the analysand in order to suggest an explanation of what the terminus of analysis looks like.
    • The Journey to Manhood: George Lucas' Saga of Sacrifice and Salvation

      Seerveld, Calvin; Wong, Fran; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1991-12)
    • Karl Polanyi and the Social Embeddedness of Economic Life: a Critique of the rationality assumption in economics

      Marshall, Paul; Woods, David; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 1987-08)
      Economic rationality refers to the efficient use of resources so as to satisfy human ends as fully as possible. Rationality, taken in this sense, has been a consistent and important theme in the history of economic thought. Only in this century however has rationality been explicitly formulated as a basic assumption of individual behaviour in economic theory. [Partial abstract taken from thesis]
    • Kingfishers and Criteria: a New Approach to the Engineering Design Method

      Zuidervaart, Lambert; Groenewold, Benjamin; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2006-10)
      The usual method of designing a solution for a problem, which applies general principles to a specific situation, tends to overlook the unique features of each situation and so must inevitably efface the very structure of what it means to create, and so resolve diversity and plurality into blank uniformity. This is grave problem which a renewed attention to the individuality of things might help resolve. This project considers the criticism of several thinkers (including John Duns Scotus, Martin Heidegger, Theodor Adorno, and J.C. Jones) on the schema of general and particular that undergirds the engineering design method. It then seeks to open up further the suggestions these thinkers have for a new approach to the design method not enthralled to an understanding of general categories, but grounded in a contemplation of the individual.
    • Love's Circumscriptions - the self in hide(ing) - : Surviving and Reviving the Truth

      Olthuis, James H.; Leaman, Michele; Institute for Christian Studies (Institute for Christian Studies, 2005-11)
      I trace Jacques Derrida's notions of self and truth in Circumfession. This text paints a gruesome self-portrait depicting the inescapable violence of subjectivity. The self is born in blood. Derrida courageously confesses to being a casualty of this lovelessness. Similarly, exploring the depth of patriarchy's inscriptions requires facing the painful truth of my bleeding self. Investigating these wounds seems to reopen them, making me complicit in my own oppression. Drawing from the rich narrative of Ingeborg Bachmann's novel Malina, I allow feminists such as Helene Cixous, Luce Irigaray, Drucilla Cornell and bell hooks to engage Derrida's notions of the wounded and wounding self. Beginning in this bloody place, they attempt to write a way-out of the disempowering systems of subjectivity to which the female self seems confined. They write in order that love will bleed some light on the struggle for empowered female subjectivity, re-writing the self as a space of love rather than violence.