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dc.contributor.advisorSweetman, Robert
dc.contributor.authorDeMoor, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-08T19:49:11Z
dc.date.available2013-03-08T19:49:11Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTION
dc.date.issued2003-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/271602
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues that, in spite of his explicit denunciation of Aristotle's theory of perception and thought, Thomas Reid's own theory of perception marks a return to the central themes of Aristotle's theory. It is argued, first, that Aristotle's 'De Anima' presents an account of sensation and thought in which the functions of the object of perception play the determining role with respect to the structure, order and intelligibility of the act of perception. Thomas Aquinas' and Descartes' transformation of Aristotle's account are then discussed, showing how the "apparatus" of Aristotle's theory remains while the ground of order and intelligibility is shifted from the functions of the object of perception to those of the perceiver as subject. The theories of the British empiricists are then shown to be continuous with this transformation of Aristotle's thought. Finally, it is argued that Reid returns to an objectivism by way of his rejection of the subjectivistic transformation wrought by Descartes et al. It is argued that this rejection is not---as Reid himself believes---a rejection of the crucial aspects of Aristotle's theory, but instead constitutes a return to its primary themes and theses.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR17788.PDFen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.subjectReid, Thomas, 1710-1796en_GB
dc.subjectAristotleen_GB
dc.subjectPerception (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.subjectSenses and sensationen_GB
dc.subjectKnowledge, Theory ofen_GB
dc.subject.lcshAristotle. De animaen_GB
dc.subject.lcshPerception (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.subject.lcshSenses and sensationen_GB
dc.subject.lcshKnowledge, Theory ofen_GB
dc.titleNot Ideas About the Thing But the Thing Itself: Thomas Reid's Epistemology in the Light of Artistotle's "De Anima"en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleMaster of Philosophical Foundations
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
html.description.abstractThis thesis argues that, in spite of his explicit denunciation of Aristotle's theory of perception and thought, Thomas Reid's own theory of perception marks a return to the central themes of Aristotle's theory. It is argued, first, that Aristotle's 'De Anima' presents an account of sensation and thought in which the functions of the object of perception play the determining role with respect to the structure, order and intelligibility of the act of perception. Thomas Aquinas' and Descartes' transformation of Aristotle's account are then discussed, showing how the "apparatus" of Aristotle's theory remains while the ground of order and intelligibility is shifted from the functions of the object of perception to those of the perceiver as subject. The theories of the British empiricists are then shown to be continuous with this transformation of Aristotle's thought. Finally, it is argued that Reid returns to an objectivism by way of his rejection of the subjectivistic transformation wrought by Descartes et al. It is argued that this rejection is not---as Reid himself believes---a rejection of the crucial aspects of Aristotle's theory, but instead constitutes a return to its primary themes and theses.


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