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dc.contributor.advisorAnsell, Nicholas Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHocking, Jeffrey S.
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-03T19:02:55Z
dc.date.available2013-05-03T19:02:55Z
dc.date.availableNO_RESTRICTIONen_GB
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10756/288471
dc.description.abstractThis thesis lays out a critique of the libertarian autonomy in Clark Pinnock's open theism. It contends that libertarian autonomy (defined as the choice to do otherwise) is unable to do justice to the fuller sense of freedom described in the biblical narrative. Offering more than a critique, this thesis suggests an alternative definition of freedom by qualifying Karl Barth's "freedom as obedience" as 'freedom as faithfulness'. As such, true freedom is contrasted to the autonomy that leads to evil, and is found beyond the false dichotomy of compatibilism and incompatibilism, heteronomy and autonomy. Freedom is recognized as a good gift of creation and a promise of the eschaton, and thus must be distanced from the shadow of evil which haunts human autonomy. Ultimately, this thesis contends that faithfulness to God as the source and call of life leads to responsive, transformative, and eschatologically unlimited freedom.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/thesescanada/vol2/002/MR58275.PDFen_GB
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.subjectPinnock, Clark H., 1937-en_GB
dc.subjectOpen theismen_GB
dc.subjectLibertarianismen_GB
dc.subjectFreedom (Theology)en_GB
dc.subject.lcshOpen theismen_GB
dc.subject.lcshLibertarianismen_GB
dc.subject.lcshLiberty--Religious aspects--Christianityen_GB
dc.titleFreedom Un/Limited: a Sympathetic Critique of Libertarian Freedom in the Open Theism of Clark Pinnocken
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Christian Studiesen_GB
dc.type.degreetitleMaster of Arts (Philosophy)en_GB
dc.rights.holderThis Work has been made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws of Canada without the written authority from the copyright owner.en_GB
html.description.abstractThis thesis lays out a critique of the libertarian autonomy in Clark Pinnock's open theism. It contends that libertarian autonomy (defined as the choice to do otherwise) is unable to do justice to the fuller sense of freedom described in the biblical narrative. Offering more than a critique, this thesis suggests an alternative definition of freedom by qualifying Karl Barth's "freedom as obedience" as 'freedom as faithfulness'. As such, true freedom is contrasted to the autonomy that leads to evil, and is found beyond the false dichotomy of compatibilism and incompatibilism, heteronomy and autonomy. Freedom is recognized as a good gift of creation and a promise of the eschaton, and thus must be distanced from the shadow of evil which haunts human autonomy. Ultimately, this thesis contends that faithfulness to God as the source and call of life leads to responsive, transformative, and eschatologically unlimited freedom.


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